Tuesday, June 19, 2012

A Photo A Day For 6 Months: Day 40: Snowy Egret In November



"Don't shoot what it looks like, shoot what it feels like."

~Alan David Harvey

As an amateur photographer, I do find myself doing a lot of editing with light and angles, and yes, at times with my photo editing software. In a perfect world I try to look beyond the obvious in front of me, to the impression behind it. It probably comes from my love for Impressionist art. If you ever visit me, you will find book, after book relating to Impressionist art. How about you? Do you prefer the raw image, without a lot of editing? Or do you find yourself going beyond the immediate with photo editing tools? Do you plan out each shot carefully, or do you shoot by instinct? Tell me, what motivates you to do your photography?

Opinions please.

~Me :)


2 comments:

jr cline said...

I'm a mixed bag: planned photos, scheduled portrait work, planned event shoots, spontaneous photos (I always have a camera with me), and experimental work.
Just about all the photos I take with my iPhone have filters applied. These would be most the experimental photos.
The shots in the other groups have much less editing: cropping (maybe), slight level adjustment, and if needed some minor sharpening. For low light situations I'll do some noise reduction.
I really like the bird's pose. Great timing.

Here is my link: http://jrclinephotography.blogspot.com/2012/06/apadf6-40.html

sunflowerkat321 said...

Like JR, I can really vary on the purist vs. modified or stylized image. Something about the photo will lead me to keep it real or get creative with photoshop. I've seen such marvelous work done with textures and layers and some photos lend themselves to it so well it's like magic. But there's also magic and wonder in realistic beauty. I love that the sky is the limit and either way, the finished image is an expression of my spirit.

I posted today!! Surprise, Surprise! Did a little catch up...there are four photos today!

http://inmydreamssfk.blogspot.com/2012/06/four-blackbirds.html